Redux

All of us are free. Some of us are freer than others.

I find it amusing when the same people who so fervently defended the actions of armed, domestic anti-government militants involved in the recent insurgency at the Bundy family ranch are so quick to criticize any person with black skin who nonviolently challenges the police for stepping out of line. It isn’t illegal to record the police. After all, ‘if they’ve done nothing wrong, they’ve got nothing to hide.’ Racial profiling leads to false arrests, police brutality, and the police murdering black people, every day, and it’s been this way since way back when. The evidence is very difficult to suppress now, whereas in the past the history of the oppressed has been conveniently distorted, edited, and deleted. When I learned so-called ‘american history,’ I learned little of the indigenous, but much of the invaders. When I went looking for the indigenous, I came up empty handed.
When I look at my family and the families of almost everyone in this country who is black, I see a culture that was systematically destroyed. The farthest my family history could possibly go back is to tax papers from the sale of my slave ancestors between one and two hundred years ago. When I look at the so-called Americans so constantly referenced in the ‘history’ books, I see names, families, traditions, cultures, and practices inherited from many hundreds of years before that. Sean Hannity swears that black people are poor, lazy criminals who can’t stop vigorously breeding long enough to take responsibility for their actions, and that is the only reason that there have always been a disproportionately high percentage of black interaction with the criminal justice system in this country, since it’s beginning. I used to hate Fox News, but now I find I pretty entertaining. Not in a train wreck sort of way, either. They are all trolls. America is just a little too dumb for sarcasm.
The agenda of the right wing media in this country picks and chooses when to apply its beliefs to its defense of certain public policies; the police carrying out a centuries-long campaign against black men and children is totally justified, but zoning enforcement against the monetary interests of a white family in rural Nevada is outright tyranny.
The government is always trying to take away our guns, and everyone should be armed, and the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is another bad guy with a gun or whatever nonsense slogan they use, but they vote TIME AND TIME AGAIN to elect warmongering officials who vow to continue to repeatedly over-fund the military/police at the cost of everything else. The same conservatives who use an interesting interpretation of the 2nd amendment to demand that the citizenry be armed are a part of the same zealotry that has created a military that can very surgically destroy the world’s total population. It doesn’t matter how many pickup trucks, confederate flags and AR-15s you can find in Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, and Arizona combined; it wouldn’t take many air-to-ground strikes to quell the kind of insurgency that these uninformed so-called patriots think they can maintain. If you’re used to being stunned and arrested, it’s likely much easier to think that a rifle and some cameras will protect you. If you’re used to seeing the police murder people because they look like you and repeatedly get away with it, it’s a little harder to justify the type of insurgency that white people get away with.
Can you imagine how many people would have been killed if Occupy Wall Street was a movement led by black youth?
If the republican party was really about the anti-government rhetoric they seem to whole-heartedly embrace when democrats are in power, their actions would reflect it. Instead they’re lining their pockets. If the democratic party was really about trying to create a better cooperative society to hand down to the next generation, it would be evident. Neither side is about a real change. It’s not a competition between democrats and republicans. They are creating needs to which they have already created solutions. They are eating us like an infection, and the very system designed to fight this pathogen is now in league with it against us.
If you knew what was going on, even though it’s already too late, you’d do something.

2014 Extreme Police Brutality in USA - RIP to all innocent ppl

To the tune of “Us & Them” by the Flaming Lips. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Palestinians express solidarity with the people of FergusonAugust 17, 2014
We the undersigned Palestinian individuals and groups express our solidarity with the family of Michael Brown, a young unarmed black man gunned down by police on August 9th in Ferguson, Missouri. We wish to express our support and solidarity with the people of Ferguson who have taken their struggle to the street, facing a militarized police occupation.
From all factions and sectors of our dislocated society, we send you our commitment to stand with you in your hour of pain and time of struggle against the oppression that continues to target our black brothers and sisters in nearly every aspect of their lives.
We understand your moral outrage. We empathize with your hurt and anger. We understand the impulse to rebel against the infrastructure of a racist capitalist system that systematically pushes you to the margins of humanity.  
And we stand with you.
We recognize the disregard and disrespect for black bodies and black life endemic to the supremacist system that rules the land with wanton brutality. Your struggles through the ages have been an inspiration to us as we fight our own battles for basic human dignities. We continue to find inspiration and strength from your struggles through the ages and your revolutionary leaders, like Malcolm X, Huey Newton, Kwame Ture, Angela Davis, Fred Hampton, Bobby Seale and others.
We honor the life of Michael Brown, cut short less than a week before he was due to begin university.  And we honor the far too many more killed in similar circumstances, motivated by racism and contempt for black life: Ezell Ford, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Tarika Wilson, Malcolm Ferguson, Renisha McBride, Amadou Diallo, Yvette Smith, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell, Kathryn Johnston, Rekia Boyd and too many others to count.
With a Black Power fist in the air, we salute the people of Ferguson and join in your demands for justice.
Signatories
Susan Abulhawa, novelist and activist
Linah Alsaafin, graduate student, SOAS
Budour Hassan
Rinad Abdulla, Professor, Birzeit University
Ramzy Baroud, Managing Editor, Middle East Eye
Diana Buttu, Lawyer, Palestine
Rana Baker, graduate student, SOAS
Abbas Hamideh, activist and organizer
Abir Kopty
Ahlam Muhtaseb, Professor, CSU
Alaa Milbes, Ramallah, Palestine
Alaa Marwan, Ramallah, Palestine
Nour Joudah, Washington DC
Ali Zbeidat, Sakhnin, Palestine
Areej Alragabi , Jerusalem, Palestine
Areej Saeb, student, Jerusalem
Asma Jaber
Beesan Ramadan, Nablus
Dina Zbidat, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Dr Jess Ghannam, UCSF
Huwaida Arraf, Attorney, New York
Nejma Awad, Tetra Tech DPK
Monadel Herzallah, USPCN, San Francisco Bay Area
Ghassan Hussein
Dinna Omar
Randa C. Issa
Amal Khoury, MD MPH, Washington, DC
Amani Barakat Moorpark, California
Fadi Quran 
Fajr Harb
Falastine Dwikat, PCACBI
Hala Gabriel
Khaled Jarrar
Osama Ahmad, AMP Bay Area director
Hala Turjman
Halla Shoaibi, Birzeit University
Harun Arsalai  
Zaid Shuaibi
Hurriyah Ziada
Dima Eleiwa, Shujaiyah, Gaza, Palestine
Jamil Salem, Birzeit University
Karam Saleem, International Solidarity Movement, Palestine
Khaled Barakat
Khuzama Hanoon, Palestine
Laila Awartani, Ramallah, Palestine
Lana Habash, Let’s Go There Collective
Lana Khoury, Washington DC
Yousef Aljamal, University of Malaysia 
Safwan Hamdi
Leena Barakat
Lema Nazeeh, lawyer
Yara Kayyali Abbas, Palestine
Mariam Barghouti, Birzeit University
Mohammad Ayyad, graduate student, SOAS
Nader Elkhuzundar
Nancy Mansour, Existence is Resistance, New York/Palestine
Mohammed Alkhader, Birzeit University
Nazik Hassan, attorney, Riverside, California
Nora Taha
Rena Zuabi
Roleen Tafakji-Haidami
Samera Sood
Sana Ibrahim
Sherene Seikaly, UCSB
Taher Herzallah
Tamara Reem, Washington DC
Ahmad Nimer, Palestine
Riya Al’sanah, journalist, London
Alaa Milbes, Ramallah
Belal Dabour, Gaza doctor
Huda Asfour, PhD, Durham NC
Iyad Afalqa, Irvine, CA
Ruba Leech, Portland, OR
Rashad Al-Dabbagh, Network of Arab American Professionals
Maysoon Suleiman-Khatib, Civil Rights Specialist
Diana Alzeer, Ramallah, Palestine
Mona Kadah, Boston MA
Lucy Garbett, Jerusalem, Palestine
Hadeel Assali, Columbia University, NYC
Magid Shihade, Oakland, CA
Tamara Tamimi, Palestine
Hammam Farah, psychotherapist and editor
Dina Elmuti, Treatment and Rehabilitation Center for Victims of Torture
Laila Hamdan, Portland OR
Bushra Shamma, VA, USA
Rev. Fahed Abuakel, Presbyterian minister , Atlanta, GA
Rehab Nazzal, artist, Canada
Ezees Silwady, Palestine
Dua’ Nakhala, freelance researcher, Belgium
Amal Oweis, Palestine
Shaheen Nassar, UCR
Amin Dallal, youth counselor
Dr. Tariq Shadid, surgeon
Zaha Hassan, Esq
Randa Issa, PhD
Murad Saleh, GED
Lila Sharif, Ph.D
Sa’ed Atshan, Ph.D
Rasha Khoury, MD Jerusalem
Hadeel Assali, Columbia University, NYC
Rabab Ibrahim Abdulhadi, Associate Professor of Race and Resistance Studies, San Francisco University
Tanya Keilani
Shahd Abusalama
Organizations
American Muslims for Palestine
Free Amer Jubran Campaign
International Solidarity Movement, Palestine
Let’s Go There Collective
Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network
Students for Justice in Palestine, University of New Mexico
The Campaign to Free Ahmad Sa’adat
Bay Area Intifada, Bay Area
PAWA, Palestinian American Women Association
NSJP, National Students for Justice in Palestine
Americans United for Palestinian Human Rights
Mashjar Juthour, Palestine
Harvard Palestine Solidarity Committee
Al-Awda NY, the Palestine Right to Return Coalition 
Stop the Wall
The US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel
SourcePhoto: Hamde Abu expresses solidarity with Ferguson.

Reblogged from disciplesofmalcolm

thepeoplesrecord:

Palestinians express solidarity with the people of Ferguson
August 17, 2014

We the undersigned Palestinian individuals and groups express our solidarity with the family of Michael Brown, a young unarmed black man gunned down by police on August 9th in Ferguson, Missouri. We wish to express our support and solidarity with the people of Ferguson who have taken their struggle to the street, facing a militarized police occupation.

From all factions and sectors of our dislocated society, we send you our commitment to stand with you in your hour of pain and time of struggle against the oppression that continues to target our black brothers and sisters in nearly every aspect of their lives.

We understand your moral outrage. We empathize with your hurt and anger. We understand the impulse to rebel against the infrastructure of a racist capitalist system that systematically pushes you to the margins of humanity.  

And we stand with you.

We recognize the disregard and disrespect for black bodies and black life endemic to the supremacist system that rules the land with wanton brutality. Your struggles through the ages have been an inspiration to us as we fight our own battles for basic human dignities. We continue to find inspiration and strength from your struggles through the ages and your revolutionary leaders, like Malcolm X, Huey Newton, Kwame Ture, Angela Davis, Fred Hampton, Bobby Seale and others.

We honor the life of Michael Brown, cut short less than a week before he was due to begin university.  And we honor the far too many more killed in similar circumstances, motivated by racism and contempt for black life: Ezell Ford, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Tarika Wilson, Malcolm Ferguson, Renisha McBride, Amadou Diallo, Yvette Smith, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell, Kathryn Johnston, Rekia Boyd and too many others to count.

With a Black Power fist in the air, we salute the people of Ferguson and join in your demands for justice.

Signatories

  • Susan Abulhawa, novelist and activist
  • Linah Alsaafin, graduate student, SOAS
  • Budour Hassan
  • Rinad Abdulla, Professor, Birzeit University
  • Ramzy Baroud, Managing Editor, Middle East Eye
  • Diana Buttu, Lawyer, Palestine
  • Rana Baker, graduate student, SOAS
  • Abbas Hamideh, activist and organizer
  • Abir Kopty
  • Ahlam Muhtaseb, Professor, CSU
  • Alaa Milbes, Ramallah, Palestine
  • Alaa Marwan, Ramallah, Palestine
  • Nour Joudah, Washington DC
  • Ali Zbeidat, Sakhnin, Palestine
  • Areej Alragabi , Jerusalem, Palestine
  • Areej Saeb, student, Jerusalem
  • Asma Jaber
  • Beesan Ramadan, Nablus
  • Dina Zbidat, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Dr Jess Ghannam, UCSF
  • Huwaida Arraf, Attorney, New York
  • Nejma Awad, Tetra Tech DPK
  • Monadel Herzallah, USPCN, San Francisco Bay Area
  • Ghassan Hussein
  • Dinna Omar
  • Randa C. Issa
  • Amal Khoury, MD MPH, Washington, DC
  • Amani Barakat Moorpark, California
  • Fadi Quran 
  • Fajr Harb
  • Falastine Dwikat, PCACBI
  • Hala Gabriel
  • Khaled Jarrar
  • Osama Ahmad, AMP Bay Area director
  • Hala Turjman
  • Halla Shoaibi, Birzeit University
  • Harun Arsalai  
  • Zaid Shuaibi
  • Hurriyah Ziada
  • Dima Eleiwa, Shujaiyah, Gaza, Palestine
  • Jamil Salem, Birzeit University
  • Karam Saleem, International Solidarity Movement, Palestine
  • Khaled Barakat
  • Khuzama Hanoon, Palestine
  • Laila Awartani, Ramallah, Palestine
  • Lana Habash, Let’s Go There Collective
  • Lana Khoury, Washington DC
  • Yousef Aljamal, University of Malaysia 
  • Safwan Hamdi
  • Leena Barakat
  • Lema Nazeeh, lawyer
  • Yara Kayyali Abbas, Palestine
  • Mariam Barghouti, Birzeit University
  • Mohammad Ayyad, graduate student, SOAS
  • Nader Elkhuzundar
  • Nancy Mansour, Existence is Resistance, New York/Palestine
  • Mohammed Alkhader, Birzeit University
  • Nazik Hassan, attorney, Riverside, California
  • Nora Taha
  • Rena Zuabi
  • Roleen Tafakji-Haidami
  • Samera Sood
  • Sana Ibrahim
  • Sherene Seikaly, UCSB
  • Taher Herzallah
  • Tamara Reem, Washington DC
  • Ahmad Nimer, Palestine
  • Riya Al’sanah, journalist, London
  • Alaa Milbes, Ramallah
  • Belal Dabour, Gaza doctor
  • Huda Asfour, PhD, Durham NC
  • Iyad Afalqa, Irvine, CA
  • Ruba Leech, Portland, OR
  • Rashad Al-Dabbagh, Network of Arab American Professionals
  • Maysoon Suleiman-Khatib, Civil Rights Specialist
  • Diana Alzeer, Ramallah, Palestine
  • Mona Kadah, Boston MA
  • Lucy Garbett, Jerusalem, Palestine
  • Hadeel Assali, Columbia University, NYC
  • Magid Shihade, Oakland, CA
  • Tamara Tamimi, Palestine
  • Hammam Farah, psychotherapist and editor
  • Dina Elmuti, Treatment and Rehabilitation Center for Victims of Torture
  • Laila Hamdan, Portland OR
  • Bushra Shamma, VA, USA
  • Rev. Fahed Abuakel, Presbyterian minister , Atlanta, GA
  • Rehab Nazzal, artist, Canada
  • Ezees Silwady, Palestine
  • Dua’ Nakhala, freelance researcher, Belgium
  • Amal Oweis, Palestine
  • Shaheen Nassar, UCR
  • Amin Dallal, youth counselor
  • Dr. Tariq Shadid, surgeon
  • Zaha Hassan, Esq
  • Randa Issa, PhD
  • Murad Saleh, GED
  • Lila Sharif, Ph.D
  • Sa’ed Atshan, Ph.D
  • Rasha Khoury, MD Jerusalem
  • Hadeel Assali, Columbia University, NYC
  • Rabab Ibrahim Abdulhadi, Associate Professor of Race and Resistance Studies, San Francisco University
  • Tanya Keilani
  • Shahd Abusalama

Organizations

  • American Muslims for Palestine
  • Free Amer Jubran Campaign
  • International Solidarity Movement, Palestine
  • Let’s Go There Collective
  • Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network
  • Students for Justice in Palestine, University of New Mexico
  • The Campaign to Free Ahmad Sa’adat
  • Bay Area Intifada, Bay Area
  • PAWA, Palestinian American Women Association
  • NSJP, National Students for Justice in Palestine
  • Americans United for Palestinian Human Rights
  • Mashjar Juthour, Palestine
  • Harvard Palestine Solidarity Committee
  • Al-Awda NY, the Palestine Right to Return Coalition 
  • Stop the Wall
  • The US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel

Source
Photo: Hamde Abu expresses solidarity with Ferguson.

thepeoplesrecord:

New Orleans PD shoots unarmed black man in the head, doesn’t report incident for 2 daysAugust 17, 2014
While most of the nation’s attention has been focused on the police shooting deaths of unarmed African Americans around the country — most notably Michael Brown and Ezell Ford — one story managed to slip under the media’s radar. News of a young African-American man shot in the head by a New Orleans police officer on Monday managed to go unreported because the police department never released details about the shooting.
The victim, identified as 26-year-old Armand Bennett, was shot in the head Monday during a traffic stop with a New Orleans police officer. He has been admitted to the intensive care unit of a local hospital. Armand’s attorney Nandi Campbell told UPTOWN via email, “My client was shot in the head and staples were required to close the wound.”
He was with his brother in a parked car, near the Tall Timbers subdivision, when officers confronted them with their guns drawn. Tall Timbers is a fairly affluent neighborhood, where Armand’s brother is a resident. The brother reported that a female officer fired two shots at them.
Campbell also tell us, ”He was not armed. After the first [shot], Armand started running toward his brother’s home. He was fired upon again as he was running. I’m unclear about whether he was in car when first shot was fired, but he was close to the car when the first shot happened.”
The story was first reported on Monday, which had a bare bones report that an “officer needs assistance” call was placed on the 3700 block of Mimosa Ct. in Algiers, a community in New Orleans. The NOPD reported an officer, recently identified as Officer Lisa Lewis, suffered a minor injury to her right hand during a scuffle with a combative suspect around 1:30 a.m. Details were not released that anyone had been shot or what the confrontation was about.
Campbell said there is an ongoing investigation into her client’s ordeal. At this time, Bennett has been charged with five outstanding warrants, including illegal possession of a weapon, resisting an officer (Gretna, LA), resisting an officer (New Orleans), possession of marijuana, and criminal damage to property, according to WWLTV.
A public records request for information fell on deaf ears over at the NOPD until Wednesday evening when the following statement was released:
On Sunday, August 10, 2014, around 1:19 a.m., a Fourth District NOPD officer was conducting a traffic stop in the 3700 block of Mimosa Drive. During the traffic stop, the officer was injured and the suspect, 26-year-old Armand Bennett was shot.
New Orleans Police Department Superintendent Ronal Serpas publicly apologized on Wednesday for taking two days to release details about the shooting. “In this particular case it’s a complete snafu on the part of my team. I take responsibility for it, I apologize for it, and I don’t want it to happen again,” said Serpas. He said that a press release was prepared on Monday, but somehow slipped through the cracks.
“I find it simply unacceptable to you and to the public that our office failed to get the information out,” Serpas added.
After the information was made public Wednesday evening,  Campbell had this to say via email, “Normally traffic stops do not include officers approaching the car with guns drawn. [The NOPD] Chief cannot decide if it was a traffic stop or if [the] officer stopped my client because she was aware of [the] outstanding warrant.”
She continues, “According to my client and his brother, there was no tussle, wrestling, or physical altercation with my client and the officer. They totally dispute the statement made by the chief.”
Photo credit: Bennett Family
Source

Reblogged from disciplesofmalcolm

thepeoplesrecord:

New Orleans PD shoots unarmed black man in the head, doesn’t report incident for 2 days
August 17, 2014

While most of the nation’s attention has been focused on the police shooting deaths of unarmed African Americans around the country — most notably Michael Brown and Ezell Ford — one story managed to slip under the media’s radar. News of a young African-American man shot in the head by a New Orleans police officer on Monday managed to go unreported because the police department never released details about the shooting.

The victim, identified as 26-year-old Armand Bennett, was shot in the head Monday during a traffic stop with a New Orleans police officer. He has been admitted to the intensive care unit of a local hospital. Armand’s attorney Nandi Campbell told UPTOWN via email, “My client was shot in the head and staples were required to close the wound.”

He was with his brother in a parked car, near the Tall Timbers subdivision, when officers confronted them with their guns drawn. Tall Timbers is a fairly affluent neighborhood, where Armand’s brother is a resident. The brother reported that a female officer fired two shots at them.

Campbell also tell us, ”He was not armed. After the first [shot], Armand started running toward his brother’s home. He was fired upon again as he was running. I’m unclear about whether he was in car when first shot was fired, but he was close to the car when the first shot happened.”

The story was first reported on Monday, which had a bare bones report that an “officer needs assistance” call was placed on the 3700 block of Mimosa Ct. in Algiers, a community in New Orleans. The NOPD reported an officer, recently identified as Officer Lisa Lewis, suffered a minor injury to her right hand during a scuffle with a combative suspect around 1:30 a.m. Details were not released that anyone had been shot or what the confrontation was about.

Campbell said there is an ongoing investigation into her client’s ordeal. At this time, Bennett has been charged with five outstanding warrants, including illegal possession of a weapon, resisting an officer (Gretna, LA), resisting an officer (New Orleans), possession of marijuana, and criminal damage to property, according to WWLTV.

A public records request for information fell on deaf ears over at the NOPD until Wednesday evening when the following statement was released:

On Sunday, August 10, 2014, around 1:19 a.m., a Fourth District NOPD officer was conducting a traffic stop in the 3700 block of Mimosa Drive. During the traffic stop, the officer was injured and the suspect, 26-year-old Armand Bennett was shot.

New Orleans Police Department Superintendent Ronal Serpas publicly apologized on Wednesday for taking two days to release details about the shooting. “In this particular case it’s a complete snafu on the part of my team. I take responsibility for it, I apologize for it, and I don’t want it to happen again,” said Serpas. He said that a press release was prepared on Monday, but somehow slipped through the cracks.

“I find it simply unacceptable to you and to the public that our office failed to get the information out,” Serpas added.

After the information was made public Wednesday evening,  Campbell had this to say via email, “Normally traffic stops do not include officers approaching the car with guns drawn. [The NOPD] Chief cannot decide if it was a traffic stop or if [the] officer stopped my client because she was aware of [the] outstanding warrant.”

She continues, “According to my client and his brother, there was no tussle, wrestling, or physical altercation with my client and the officer. They totally dispute the statement made by the chief.”

Photo credit: Bennett Family

Source

I was having a talk with a friend today about this recent mess in Missouri. Although it was a very different perspective from my own, I am more than happy with the dialogue generated as more of the details of the events immediately surrounding the Michael Brown incident are becoming more clear.

There were peaceful protests met with military escalation, and we discussed the phenomena of an extremely high supply of militarily conceived weapons under the jurisdiction of the federal government that is direct factor in the current trend toward the militarization of the police in the united states. Take a look at what these so-called “peace officers” deployed in.

We looked into the riots that took place soon after the unarmed teen was gunned down and I pointed out that there is likely a much broader distinction between the people that were peacefully protesting and bracing for impact against the officers and those opportunists who took it upon themselves to use a lapse in public order to loot local businesses.

There is a disturbingly large number of people who are of the mind that Michael Brown deserved to be gunned down in the streets because he stole some cigarettes. When you think about it, that’s a worse punishment even than sharia law punishments for theft. Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmedenijad only cut off a boy’s hand for stealing a loaf of bread, and he did it publicly, clearly as a warning and a deterrent to other would-be thieves in the area. Darren Wilson murdered Michael Brown without any inkling that he had committed a robbery. He killed him with no suspicion of illegal activity.

By the logic of those that stand with the police on the murder of Michael Brown, the looters deserve to be gunned down in the streets. I hope they will take heed that in the court of public opinion, the police will be justified in opening fire upon all of the dissenters in Ferguson if these opportunists persist.

I hope to see a stable, organized and centralized force with a clear purpose and no tolerance for the kind of unacceptable practices of both the police and the looters move in and give this unrest a direction. The people of Ferguson stand to gain major ground for themselves, and for the oppressed all over the country if they can capitalize on the media’s attention, instead of letting it cast the entire community in a negative light.

(Source: youtube.com)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Don’t keep calm! Arm the masses for self defense
Can’t shut up, won’t shut up

Reblogged from america-wakiewakie

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Don’t keep calm! Arm the masses for self defense

Can’t shut up, won’t shut up

So many are mourning. So many are devastated. So many are disgusted at the lack of accountability. We are ashamed of ourselves because of what we allow to happen time and time again. Many of us are angry and ashamed of what has happened to countless others. Legal murder. Legally upheld murder.

Some of us quiver with anger, our heads slung low at the desperation of the current situation, tears running down the work creased hands down the forearms hardened through labor, to the elbows that hold the weight of our guilty consciences, until finally dropping to the same ground that is now the home of so many innocents.
Some have gone further, angrily standing in protest against your murderers. Still others are speaking out, as is their current supposed right to do. The bravest are calling for the resignation of the perpetrators. It’s like a sit in. It’s like marching and listening to peace speeches. It’s like singing “We Shall Not Be Moved.”
A thought occurred to me, as I read sadly about another victim. Those incompetent in their positions deserve to be relieved of duty, this is true. We see others who lose their jobs over far less obscene broaches of conduct. Tax evaders go to prison. Some of them are locked up for decades. Rupert Murdoch is going to be a prisoner for the rest of his life because of his exploitation in which no lives were lost. Security guards who fall asleep on the job get fired. Minimum wage workers who miss work or show up late are fired every single day in this country and no one has to die before their actions are such that they are deemed unfit for the most menial of jobs.
I’m unsatisfied with the officers who kill us being given leave to skirt the responsibility to the society they swore an oath to uphold. In a better world, they would have at least been reprimanded, as so few of these guilty officers are. Sadly, in an even better world these officers would be quickly fired as so many are who are guilty of comparatively insignificant offenses. Even such a theoretical instance would leave me unsatisfied nonetheless.
I would not be satisfied until these criminals, these armed, uniformed, terrorizing thugs are prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Michael Brown’s passing is another wake up call to those of us nervously scampering through an oppressive police state. Will we waste this opportunity, as we have wasted so many others, to do something meaningful and effective to protect ourselves? Murder isn’t right, no matter what clothes are involved. Police uniforms, pointed hoods, hoodies, and black skin have been an excuse to kill black men for far too long. Murder should never be justified, regardless of clothes that are involved.
Every time another of us is illegally detained, framed, gunned down, choked to death, beaten, sodomized, hospitalized, and maimed by these so-called public servants, we are reminded of our cowardice. We should have done something long ago. If the system cannot or will not be accountable, as the case clearly is, it’s time for us to hold the system accountable. If the law is to be respected, it must be enforced, evenly and fairly. Murder in this country should never be justified, regardless of the clothes involved.
They expected retaliation. After they murdered that boy they brought officers, armor, more weapons, dogs. They used these tactics to intimidate the Ferguson mourners into yet another tacit round, and it worked. It will always work.
Until the day it doesn’t.
image
logic-and-art:

christel-thoughts:

quickhits:

Unrest in Ferguson about a lot more than police shooting unarmed teen.

the big point
look at the search rates then look at the contraband hit rates.
the police are terrorizing Black people for no good reason… even though they’re getting more evidence of crime off whites.

crunched a couple of numbers and even taking into account that the black population is about double the white population in the “local” area (i’d like some definition on that but i’ll assume in the meantime that it’s the boundaries of jurisdiction), black people as a group are being stopped 6.75 times more than white people as a group, and even when put in perspective with the population ratios, are being stopped 3.61 times more than white people (and make up 90% of the people searched).
The disparity numbers listed indicate that the black population is overrepresented in stop rates by 137%, and this number reads as way too low to me (compare to the number I calculated of 361%).
christel-thoughts pointed out the contraband rate specifically, which is notable because searches of white people produced contraband 12.33% more times than searches of black people, but the arrest rate for black individuals is virtually twice that of white people.

Reblogged from disciplesofmalcolm

logic-and-art:

christel-thoughts:

quickhits:

Unrest in Ferguson about a lot more than police shooting unarmed teen.

the big point

look at the search rates then look at the contraband hit rates.

the police are terrorizing Black people for no good reason… even though they’re getting more evidence of crime off whites.

crunched a couple of numbers and even taking into account that the black population is about double the white population in the “local” area (i’d like some definition on that but i’ll assume in the meantime that it’s the boundaries of jurisdiction), black people as a group are being stopped 6.75 times more than white people as a group, and even when put in perspective with the population ratios, are being stopped 3.61 times more than white people (and make up 90% of the people searched).

The disparity numbers listed indicate that the black population is overrepresented in stop rates by 137%, and this number reads as way too low to me (compare to the number I calculated of 361%).

christel-thoughts pointed out the contraband rate specifically, which is notable because searches of white people produced contraband 12.33% more times than searches of black people, but the arrest rate for black individuals is virtually twice that of white people.

The Uncompromising Revolution

The FBI and CIA - Kwame Ture

(Source: youtube.com)

fromquarkstoquasars:

The U.S. Set to Limit Freedom and Knowledge Sharing on the Internet?

We’ve put off posting about this. We try to stick to just the science. But this is absurd.http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/the-u-s-set-to-limit-freedom-and-knowledge-sharing-on-the-internet/

Reblogged from fromquarkstoquasars

fromquarkstoquasars:

The U.S. Set to Limit Freedom and Knowledge Sharing on the Internet?

We’ve put off posting about this. We try to stick to just the science. But this is absurd.
http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/the-u-s-set-to-limit-freedom-and-knowledge-sharing-on-the-internet/